Nearly every college student in America has likely heard of looming student loan trouble. Like a fairy tale that warns children of the deep, dark forest of dangers, the mountain of debt that countless students have ahead of them can seem a projected adulthood nightmare. The reality of education in today’s society, unfortunately, can come with a steep price tag — one that some graduates carry on their shoulders for decades, and one that dissuades others from seeking a college degree altogether. For Florida students, is there an answer to this debacle?

As with many types of debt, some students and graduates have turned to personal bankruptcy for solutions. Last April, Vice News considered the process of filing personal bankruptcy on student loans, and why some find it difficult to do so. Millions implore loan servicers to readjust payment plans, only to discover the exact same obstacle the following month. Shockingly enough, some experts point the finger at loan giants such as Sallie Mae for carrying out dishonest practices, claiming these companies loaned money to those they knew would have trouble repaying. Sallie Mae admitted involvement, while other companies have denied such allegations. Vice quotes some experts who argue that one route to solving the issue is to revive bankruptcy protection to student loans — a procedure that has not been active since 1976.

U.S. News also considers the ways students discharge loans in bankruptcy, giving a somewhat uplifting stance on this option. According to a 2011 study U.S. News highlighted in the article, 40 percent of borrowers who filed bankruptcy — and included their student loans — saw discharges of student debt. Although it is important to consider long-term costs and other financial commitments when applying for loans, bankruptcy is often the only answer. U.S. News adds that it is usually ideal for graduates to check if they pass the Brunner test and consider all options before making decisions to file personal bankruptcy, but that doing so can save many from the ongoing burden of student loan debt.